Awards and Other Notifications: Favourite Posts

Celebrating five years made me think about all the posts I’ve done. Looking into the stats, it turns out this is my 1,402th post, which got me wondering about which ones I was especially fond of. I had a think and came up with the following. Feel free to have a look at any of them or share any posts from your blog that have particular resonance for you.

Bond in Motion
Stylish and Iconic Female Outfits
Lumiere Festival
George Bellows’ Best Paintings
Desert Island Films
National Geographic Water and Ice Photographs
Harry Potter Studios Tour
The Things They Carried Review
Truly Dire Football Kits
Things to See: Wimbledon Tour
Things to See: Pink Floyd: Their Mortal Remains
Sporting Statues

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Line(s) of the Day #Arrival

Arrival quote

Dr. Louise Banks: If you could see your whole life from start to finish, would you change things?
Ian Donnelly: Maybe I’d say what I felt more often. I-I don’t know.

Amy Adams and Jeremy Renner in the thought-provoking science fiction film Arrival (2016). Based on the short story “Story of Your Life” by Ted Chiang, it tells of a linguistic professor who who is in charge of communicating with beings who have landed from another planet.

Creative: Yesterday’s Tomorrow

Unlost yesterdays lie luxuriously while life flies fast forwards
Lovingly lasting in memory, they await instruction
For when they must be ready for repeated viewings
By the audience comforted by blurred certainty.

But what those memories know, as we know,
Is that yesterdays can rust to nothing
And so unexplored and unfelt memories
Must be allowed to crash the revolving stage.

Because the roulette wheel is best when spinning
And triumph waltzes with infinite shades of possibilities
At kaleidoscopic speeds with unveiled messages
That life is not remembering but redesigning, living not reliving.

Line(s) of the Day #TheMenRunningPast

Contemplation

If we happen to be walking along a street at night, and a man, visible already from afar — because the street inclines gently uphill in front of us, and there’s a full moon — comes running towards us, then we will not grab hold of him, even if he’s feeble and ragged, even if someone is running after him, yelling, but rather we will let him run on unmolested.

For it is night, and it is not our fault that the street in front of us in the moonlit night is on an incline and, moreover, it is possible that the two men have devised their chase for their own amusement, perhaps they are both in pursuit of a third man, perhaps the first of them is being unjustly pursued, perhaps the second means to kill him and we would become accessory to his murder, perhaps the two of them don’t know the first thing about one another and each one is just running home to bed on his own account, perhaps they are two somnambulists, perhaps the first of them is carrying a weapon.

And finally, may we not be tired, and have we not had a lot of wine to drink? We are relieved not to see the second man.

The full story of ‘The Men Running Past’ by Czechoslovakian (now known as the Czech Republic) Franz Kafka, from the collection Contemplation (1913)