Line(s) of the Day #WeHaveAlwaysLivedintheCastle

We Have Always Lived in The castle

I remember that I stood on the library steps holding my books and looking for a minute at the soft hinted green in the branches against the sky and wishing, as I always did, that I could walk home across the sky instead of through the village.

The novella masterpiece We Have Always Lived in the Castle (1962) by Gothic writer Shirley Jackson, who also wrote one of the finest short stories with The Lottery (1948). As told by the unreliable narrator Mary Katherine ‘Merrikat’ Blackwood, it tells of a family’s ostracising in a small town after a poisoning incident that killed four members of the family.

Line(s) of the Day #TerryPratchett

SIR TERRY PRATCHETT (1948-2015)

Stories of imagination tend to upset those without one.

The hugely missed Sir Terry Pratchett (1945 – 2015), author of nearly 100 published works and 85 million sales. The highly prolific English writer was long recognised for his wit and imagination and later, his brave fight against Alzheimer’s.

Line(s) of the Day #ThreeMenInABoat

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It always does seem to me that I am doing more work than I should do. It is not that I object to the work, mind you; I like work: it fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours.

Arguably the most famous lines from Three Men in a Boat (1889), the charming book by Jerome K. Jerome. Filled with amusing and irreverent anecdotes, the story tells of three friends (and the fox terrier Montmorency) who decide to take a trip along the River Thames for a fortnight.

Line(s) of the Day #TheNightCircus

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The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not.

The opening lines of the fantastically enchanting debut novel The Night Circus (2011) by Erin Morgenstern. I was spoiled for choice for which line to use, but I like that even from the very beginning the uniqueness and mystery of the circus has been set. Something completely pivotal to the story.

Line(s) of the Day #WorstwardHo

samuel-beckett

Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.

The famous quote by Irish playwright Samuel Beckett from his novella Worstward Ho (1983). Winner of the 1969 Nobel Prize for Literature, Beckett was one of the most celebrated creative and influential literary minds of the 20th Century.

Line(s) of the Day #TheAlchemist

Paolo Coelho The Alchemist.jpg

It’s the possibility of having a dream come true that makes life interesting.

Taken from the The Alchemist by Brazilian writer Paulo Coelho. Originally published in 1988, the ethereal novel has sold over 65 million copies and been translated into 56 different languages.

Photography: Short Stories and Sports Books

I’ve always had a big interest in books. And amid my interest in the classic and the contemporary novels, I’ve had a big passion for short stories and sports books. I’ve quoted a few of them on my Literature and Sports pages but wanted to share them as pictorial form. You’ll find these two photos and plenty of others on my Instagram page of Raphaelalexx.

short-stories

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Line(s) of the Day #Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening

The woods are lovely, dark and deep,   
But I have promises to keep,   
And miles to go before I sleep,   

And miles to go before I sleep.

The closing lines of the poem Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening (1922) by the much loved poet Robert Frost. Written in an iambic tetrameter, it is Frost’s most famous poem, after The Road Not Taken. My thanks to the supremely talented Tosha Michelle for reminding me.

Reviews and Other Features: The Reader Problems Tag

I haven’t done any literature related posts since The Wasp Factory and even less since I answered The Inside Out Book Tag, so when I saw these literature-based questions on Galit’s Coffee N’ Notes’ website I just had to take it on. With some amusing (and semi-related) gifs of course.

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