Line(s) of the Day #WutheringHeights

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I have not broken your heart – you have broken it; and in breaking it, you have broken mine.

As said by the intensely tortured Heathcliff in Emily Bronte’s Gothic classic Wuthering Heights (1847). Famously set in the Moors of Yorkshire, the quote highlights the complex relationship between Heathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw, which drives the heart of the book. The gorgeous cover is entitled Figures in a Storm by one of my favourite artists. Percivus has nothing to do with the story but wanted to be included. It is a Penguin Classic after all.

Line(s) of the Day #TheDuchessofMalfi

The Duchess of Malfi - John Webster

Whether we fall by ambition, blood, or lust,
Like diamonds, we are cut with our own dust

As quoted by Ferdinand in The Duchess of Malfi (1612 – 1613) by John Webster, one of the great early writers. Though I’ve yet to read it, I’ve always been struck by this quote since seeing it on Amy’s blog, where she quoted it again recently.

Line(s) of the Day #SheLovedMeOnce

She loved me once and I threw it away
A love so pure there was plenty to spare
And yet not enough for me to keep
And not enough for me to share

Her and I loved in different ways, speeds and styles
At contrasting times and in different places
Her love for me now sat with old newspapers
Faded clothes, expired milk and long-forgotten faces

But my love for her caught in a sandtimer
With my heart waiting for the last grain to fall
Memories varying from light to dark and dark to light
And questions and questions challenging it all

Whether better to have loved and lost I’m not certain
I wanted to love you the way you did me
My love took too long to catch up with yours
And you never slowed down, more’s the pity

I will let go, I hold on with fewer fingers now
The future is coming into view more than the past
But while we’ll never be that us again
Your role in my life will last

After finding an old poem Some Things, I decided to fine tune another poem I wrote while back.

Line(s) of the Day #WeHaveAlwaysLivedintheCastle

We Have Always Lived in The castle

I remember that I stood on the library steps holding my books and looking for a minute at the soft hinted green in the branches against the sky and wishing, as I always did, that I could walk home across the sky instead of through the village.

The novella masterpiece We Have Always Lived in the Castle (1962) by Gothic writer Shirley Jackson, who also wrote one of the finest short stories with The Lottery (1948). As told by the unreliable narrator Mary Katherine ‘Merrikat’ Blackwood, it tells of a family’s ostracising in a small town after a poisoning incident that killed four members of the family.

Line(s) of the Day #TerryPratchett

SIR TERRY PRATCHETT (1948-2015)

Stories of imagination tend to upset those without one.

The hugely missed Sir Terry Pratchett (1945 – 2015), author of nearly 100 published works and 85 million sales. The highly prolific English writer was long recognised for his wit and imagination and later, his brave fight against Alzheimer’s.

Line(s) of the Day #ThreeMenInABoat

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It always does seem to me that I am doing more work than I should do. It is not that I object to the work, mind you; I like work: it fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours.

Arguably the most famous lines from Three Men in a Boat (1889), the charming book by Jerome K. Jerome. Filled with amusing and irreverent anecdotes, the story tells of three friends (and the fox terrier Montmorency) who decide to take a trip along the River Thames for a fortnight.

Line(s) of the Day #TheNightCircus

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The circus arrives without warning. No announcements precede it. It is simply there, when yesterday it was not.

The opening lines of the fantastically enchanting debut novel The Night Circus (2011) by Erin Morgenstern. I was spoiled for choice for which line to use, but I like that even from the very beginning the uniqueness and mystery of the circus has been set. Something completely pivotal to the story.

Line(s) of the Day #WorstwardHo

samuel-beckett

Ever tried. Ever failed. No matter. Try Again. Fail again. Fail better.

The famous quote by Irish playwright Samuel Beckett from his novella Worstward Ho (1983). Winner of the 1969 Nobel Prize for Literature, Beckett was one of the most celebrated creative and influential literary minds of the 20th Century.

Line(s) of the Day #TheAlchemist

Paolo Coelho The Alchemist.jpg

It’s the possibility of having a dream come true that makes life interesting.

Taken from the The Alchemist by Brazilian writer Paulo Coelho. Originally published in 1988, the ethereal novel has sold over 65 million copies and been translated into 56 different languages.