Line(s) of the Day #TheWindintheWillows

IMG_1567

Spring was moving in the air above and in the earth below and around him, penetrating even his dark and lowly little house with its spirit of divine discontent and longing.

A sense of the adventurous possibilities within nature, as wonderfully described in The Wind in the Willows (1908) by Kenneth Grahame. Still enchanting readers of all ages over a century after its initial publication, the much-loved children’s novel tells of the friendship of Mole, Water Rat, Toad and Badger, four anthropomorphised animals who live near the river.

Advertisements

Line(s) of the Day #ChocolateCake

screen-shot-2015-04-28-at-21-11-50

So I take a knife
I think I’ll just tidy that up a bit,
cut off the crumbly bits
scoop them all up
and into the mouth

oooooommm mmmm
nice.

Look at the cake again.

That looks a bit funny now,
one side doesn’t match the other
I’ll just even it up a bit, eh?

An excerpt from Chocolate Cake, a much-loved poem by British writer Michael Rosen. You can find it in its complete form here, where anyone who loves chocolate will identify with the child narrator. Barbra Streisand and Lora Brody would surely include themselves.

Line(s) of the Day The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of a Window and Disappeared

IMG_0830

She also had a diploma that showed that Herbert was a certified driving instructor and a receipt showing that she had just bought the local driving school and given it a new name: Eintein’s School for Driving.

This was all fantastic, Herbert thought, but… it didn’t make him a better driver, did it? Well yes, in a way it did, Amanda expained. Now he had a position. Now he would decide what was good driving and what wasn’t.  Life worked in such a way that right was not necessarily right, but rather what the person in charge said was right. 

Herbert’s face lit up: he got it!

One of the many highly amusing scenes from The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared by first novelist Jonas Jonasson. In a dual narrative, the story tells of hundred year old who decides to slip out of his old people’s home and then encounters a whole array of adventures.

Line(s) of the Day #TheCrucible

IMG_0517 (1)

It is rare for people to be asked the question which puts them squarely in front of themselves.

As said by John Proctor in the masterpiece play that is The Crucible by Arthur Miller. Published in 1953, but set in 1692, the story is based on the notorious Salem witch trials which tore a small Massachusetts town against itself. Miller admitted the play was an allegory for McCarthism, when hundreds of Americans were aggressively accused of being communists or communist sympathisers.

Line(s) of the Day #TheNarrowWay

anne_brontc3ab_by_patrick_branwell_brontc3ab_restored

But he that dares not grasp the thorn
Should never crave the rose

Taken from the poem The Narrow Way by Anne Brontë (1820 – 1849), who died at the tragically early age of 29 from illness. Anne, whose writings included the novels Agnes Grey and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, is also known for being the youngest member of the literary Brontë family.

Line of the Day #OfMiceandMen

IMG_0615

Maybe ever’body in the whole damn world is scared of each other.

As said by Slim, the “prince of the ranch”, in John Steinbeck’s novella masterpiece Of Mice and Men (1937).  Set during the Great Depression, it tells of two migrant ranch workers, George and Lennie, who dream of earning enough money to buy their own land. However problems continually arise due to lack of understanding of Lennie’s mental disability and his fiercesome strength.

Line(s) of the Day #TheTrial

IMG_4873

Someone must have been spreading lies about Josef K, for without having done anything wrong he was arrested one morning.

The opening lines of the novella The Trial by Czech-born German language writer Franz Kafka. Published posthumously in 1925, (but believed to be written around 1914 / 1915), it tells of an innocent man’s struggles to clear against a charge he is never made aware of.  I’ve long been a fan of his work and quoted my favourite of his short stories here,

Line(s) of the Day #ToAutumn #Yeats

John-Keats pic

Where are the songs of Spring? Ay, where are they?
Think not of them, thou hast thy music too –
While barred clouds bloom the soft-dying day,
And touch the stubble-plains with rosy hue

From the last stanza of To Autumn by the beloved English romantic poet John Keats (1795 – 1821). Despite his hugely untimely death at aged 25, Keats is still considered one of the greatest ever poets. You can my other favourite lines from his Ode to a Nightingale poem here.

Line(s) of the Day: Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

IMG_4457

You think the dead we loved truly ever leave us? You think that we don’t recall them more clearly in times of great trouble?

As said by the wise and benevolent Professor Albus Dumbledore in Harry Potter and The Prisoner of Azkaban (1999), the third of the series, and my favourite. You can find another example of Dumbledore’s knowledge here, and my tour of Harry Potter Studios here.

Line(s) of the Day #WutheringHeights

IMG_3873

I have not broken your heart – you have broken it; and in breaking it, you have broken mine.

As said by the intensely tortured Heathcliff in Emily Bronte’s Gothic classic Wuthering Heights (1847). Famously set in the Moors of Yorkshire, the quote highlights the complex relationship between Heathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw, which drives the heart of the book. The gorgeous cover is entitled Figures in a Storm by one of my favourite artists. Percivus has nothing to do with the story but wanted to be included. It is a Penguin Classic after all.