Line(s) of the Day #HighFidelity

I’m very good at the past. It’s the present I can’t understand.

As said by the narrator Rob Fleming in the book High Fidelity (1995) by English writer Nick Hornby, and has achieved success as adaptations for TV, film and Broadway.

Line(s) of the Day #MotiveMurderMethod

Alfred Joseph was a nice man. The type of man who would lend you his umbrella even if it meant he got sodden wet. The type of guy that would drive miles out of his way to make sure his friends got back ok. Even strangers sometimes. The type who would always bring far more than he needed to when invited to a party, but wouldn’t be annoyed if guests didn’t bring anything when he hosted. 

Indeed, he was a legend in the small town for his kindness and generosity. When little Bobby Firman broke his leg and missed out on his trip to Disneyland, Alfred was the one who set up a fundraiser and gave generously himself to make sure Bobby could go when his leg was better. When Alfred’s competitor for the Best Homemade Lemonade was disqualified through an overzealous technicality, Alfred made sure she was reinstated, even though it meant he lost out on the prize. When the town was voted among the least desirable, Alfred used it as motivation to help change its whole perception. He worked harder than anyone cleaning up the parks, scrubbing off graffiti and helping to improve dilapidated buildings. And smiled his way throughout. 

People would ask for his advice all the time and he would never mind, even when he was out shopping or in a hurry. He made so much time for everyone that people often joked that he must have more hours in the day than everybody else. It was that same humour that led people to comment that the town’s most popular attraction wasn’t the majestic 40-foot arch by the town hall, but rather the short, bespectacled and much-loved Mr Joseph. Which made the fact he wanted to kill his wife all the more surprising…

That’s the opening to my short story “Motive, Murder, Method” from my third book Always Never, Rarely Sometimes. I wanted to thank those of you who had got a copy so far and to let you know that my website http://www.alexanderraphaelwriter.com/ with all the details has now been updated. I hope you guys are all well.

Announcement: Happy times. My new book is out

I have great news for you all. My new book is out. It’s a collection of short stories called Always Never, Rarely Sometimes and I’m so happy to be able to tell you all about it. Like with Illusions, Delusions, there are seven stories but this time the focus is on more traditional storytelling with a slight twist.

Read about a regular boy named Harry Potter whose life changes overnight when the literary character becomes a phenomenon. Or about a middle aged lady who goes for quiet coffee and gets more than she bargained for when she spots a group of four friends. Not forgetting the story about an unhappy child’s Christmas being changed thanks to a very surprising encounter. And there’s plenty more 😀

Paperback UK
Kindle UK

Paperback US
Kindle US

Those are the links if you want to get a copy. It’s also part of Kindle Unlimited. Hope you’re having a wonderful day 😊

Line(s) of the Day #TheMidnightLibrary

“Between life and death there is a library, and within that library, the shelves go on forever. Every book provides a chance to try another life you could have lived. To see how things would be if you had made other choices… Would you have done anything different, if you had the chance to undo your regrets?”

Written by Matt Haig, The Midnight Library (2020) tells of a magical library where Nora Seed is able to see out different versions of her life had she made different decisions.

Line(s) of the Day #ACleanWelllightedPlace

It was very late and everyone had left the cafe except an old man who sat in the shadows the leaves of the tree made against the electric light. In the day time the
street was dusty, but at night the dew settled the dust and the old man liked to sit late because he was deaf and now at night it was quiet and he felt the difference.The two waiters inside the cafe knew that the old man was a little drunk, and while he was a good client they knew that if he became too drunk he would leave without paying, so they kept watch on him
.

The opening lines of “A Clean, Well-Lighted Place” by American writer Ernest Hemingway (1899 – 1961), from his collection of stories Winner Takes Nothing (1933). It’s still my favourite short story of his. I’m a big fan of Hemingway and have quoted him on the blog before, on a post about my favourite short story writers and on The Old Man and the Sea.

Line(s) of the Day #TheIronMan #TheIronGiant

You are who you choose to be.

As said by Howard Hogarth in children’s classic The Iron Man (1968) by British Poet Laurette Ted Hughes. Known as The Iron Giant in the United States (along with the wonderful film based on the book), it tells of a giant “metal man” who appears from out of nowhere and eats all the metal before being efriended by a young boy.

Gr8at: #BeautifulLibraries

I haven’t been doing much reading as I’ve been busy writing. But if I was in one of these liteart sanctuaries, that would definitely change! Here are eight of the world’s most beautiful libraries from all around the world. Do you have a favourite?

Continue reading

Photography: Book Spine Story

book story

I saw Cathy at 746 books had posted on Book Spine Poetry, where she arranges the spine of a set of books and turns it into a poem. I liked the idea but thought I’d arrange mine into a story concept. Here someone super rich has an dramatic epiphany after a rather lonely life and feels the need to take a silver sword so as to meet the mystical Kafka.

Line(s) of the Day #TheSilverSword

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“You won’t come with me?” said Joseph.

The boy ignored the question. He was undoing the wooden box, and he took out the little silver sword. “This is the best of my treasures he said. ‘It will bring me luck. And it will bring you luck, because you gave it to me. I don’t tell anybody my name – it is not safe. But because you gave me the sword and I didn’t borrow it, I will tell you.’ He whispered. ‘It is Jan.’

The Silver Sword (1956) by Ian Seraillier is a children’s novel that tells of three siblings and an orphan’s difficult quest to make it from Poland to Switzerland just after World War II. I read it again for the first time since Primary School and enjoyed it just as much.

Line(s) of the Day #EightMenOut

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He [Eddie Cicotte] had grown up believing it was talent that made a man big. If you were good enough and dedicated yourself, you could get to the top. Wasn’t that enough of a reward? But when he got there he had found out otherwise. They all fed off him, the men who run the show and pulled the strings and kept it working. They used him and used him and when they had used him up, they would dump him. In the few years he had been up they had always praised him and made him sound like a hero to the people of America. But all the time they paid him peanuts. The newspapermen who came to watch him pitch and wrote stories about him made even more money than he did.

Eight Men Out: The Black Sox and the 1919 World Series by Eliot Asinof, which tells of how a set of elite Chicago baseball players threw the final against the lesser fancied Cincinnati Reds for monetary gain. While the scandal is well known in American culture, there are still plenty of myths and uncertainities around the whole series. There are doubts about how much Shoeless Joe, the most famous of the eight, was involved.