Line(s) of the Day #TheSimpsons

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Barney: Well, look at the bright side, Moe: you still got us.
Moe: Yeah. Yeah, you know, that — that actually makes me feel a little better.
Homer: Why? That was the problem in the first place: you were going broke because we were your only customers. Wasn’t that the problem in the first place? That you were going broke? Moe? Moe? Hey, Moe. Oh! You’re thinking about all the money you blew, aren’t you. What was it? Fifty, sixty thousand dollars?

Another wonderful example of the fantastic humour in The Simpsons (1989 – ), as seen in the episode Bart Sells His Soul.

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Line(s) of the Day #AyrtonSenna

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On the podium, Ayrton was so nice and at one point he leaned over to me and whispered into my ear: “Well done Nigel. It’s such a good feeling, isn’t it? Now you know why I’m so difficult sometimes. I don’t ever want to lose the feeling or share it without anyone else.”

The indisputed genius that was three-time F1 World Champion Ayrton Senna, revealing in one quote his insatiable competitiveness and undeniable charm that made him so loved. The quote came in the both hugely entertaining and highly inspiring read, Staying on Track: The Autobiography (2015) by Nigel Mansell, who famously won the 1992 Formula 1 World Championship.

Line(s) of the Day #ChocolateCake

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So I take a knife
I think I’ll just tidy that up a bit,
cut off the crumbly bits
scoop them all up
and into the mouth

oooooommm mmmm
nice.

Look at the cake again.

That looks a bit funny now,
one side doesn’t match the other
I’ll just even it up a bit, eh?

An excerpt from Chocolate Cake, a much-loved poem by British writer Michael Rosen. You can find it in its complete form here, where anyone who loves chocolate will identify with the child narrator. Barbra Streisand and Lora Brody would surely include themselves.

Line(s) of the Day The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of a Window and Disappeared

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She also had a diploma that showed that Herbert was a certified driving instructor and a receipt showing that she had just bought the local driving school and given it a new name: Eintein’s School for Driving.

This was all fantastic, Herbert thought, but… it didn’t make him a better driver, did it? Well yes, in a way it did, Amanda expained. Now he had a position. Now he would decide what was good driving and what wasn’t.  Life worked in such a way that right was not necessarily right, but rather what the person in charge said was right. 

Herbert’s face lit up: he got it!

One of the many highly amusing scenes from The Hundred Year Old Man Who Climbed Out of the Window and Disappeared by first novelist Jonas Jonasson. In a dual narrative, the story tells of hundred year old who decides to slip out of his old people’s home and then encounters a whole array of adventures.

Line(s) of the Day #TheCrucible

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It is rare for people to be asked the question which puts them squarely in front of themselves.

As said by John Proctor in the masterpiece play that is The Crucible by Arthur Miller. Published in 1953, but set in 1692, the story is based on the notorious Salem witch trials which tore a small Massachusetts town against itself. Miller admitted the play was an allegory for McCarthism, when hundreds of Americans were aggressively accused of being communists or communist sympathisers.

Line(s) of the Day #OnceinaLifetime

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And you may ask yourself
What is that beautiful house?
And you may ask yourself
Where does that highway go to?
And you may ask yourself
Am I right? Am I wrong?
And you may say yourself, “My God! What have I done?

Taken from the hugely unique Once in a Lifetime song by Talking Heads, from their fourth studio album Remain in Light (1980). Though it didn’t even make the Top 10 in any major national market, the “half-spoken, half-sung” song and its video became hugely memorable.

Line(s) of the Day #MrTamborineMan

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Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
I’m not sleepy and there is no place I’m going to
Hey! Mr. Tambourine man, play a song for me
In the jingle jangle morning I’ll come following you

Taken from the album title track Mr Tamborine Man by The Byrds (1965), a cover from a Bob Dylan original. Quite surprisingly, it was actually released the same year as Dylan’s, and both were hugely successful. You can find this and other memorable cover songs here and my favourite Dylan songs here and here.

Line(s) of the Day #TheNarrowWay

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But he that dares not grasp the thorn
Should never crave the rose

Taken from the poem The Narrow Way by Anne Brontë (1820 – 1849), who died at the tragically early age of 29 from illness. Anne, whose writings included the novels Agnes Grey and The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, is also known for being the youngest member of the literary Brontë family.

Line(s) of the Day #PaintItBlack

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I see a line of cars and they’re all painted black
With flowers and my love both never to come back
I see people turn their heads and quickly look away
Like a newborn baby, it just happens every day

Taken from Paint it Black from The Rolling Stones’ studio album Aftermath (1966). A huge number one on both sides of the Atlantic, it’s still a favourite on their live tours, once I was able to see on Friday. Expect a post on it soon.