Things to See: Stanley Kubrick: The Exhibition Part 2

There was so much to see at the Design Museum’s celebration of the works of Stanley Kubrick 20 years after his passing, that one post was never going to be enough to cover all the fantastic stuff inside.

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There’s plenty of detail for one of Vietnam’s finest war films, Full Metal Jacket that focuses on the complexity of war and those involved. All the effort needed to create the setting locations, especially for the second half of the film is made clear too.

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The Shining is one of Kubrick’s, and indeed horror’s most famous films, so it is no surprise that the dedicated room has plenty to enjoy. As well as plenty of photographs, it has the most videos and excerpts to enjoy. You’ll learn that Kubrick would get the actors to dub their lines for major other foreign languages and even shot the line of “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy” with the words translated into other languages.

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Barry Lyndon,Ā Dr Strangelove or How I stopped Worrying and Learned to Love the Bomb,Ā Eyes Wide Shut and Lolita are also represented well. Barry Lyndon was filmed in 1975 but was set in the 18th century so the costumes were certainly distinctive. The masks from his final completed film Eyes Wide Shut really are elaborate. The famous war room in Dr Strangelove was created by Sir Kenneth Adam, who was the first production designer to be knighted.

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But it’s no surprise that the exhibition ends with 2001: A Space Odyssey, arguably his most famous work. The props are on a different level, with famous costumes, scale models and all the detail that ensured the film was a visual masterpiece. After visiting, you’ll be desperate to see all of his films again.

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15 thoughts on “Things to See: Stanley Kubrick: The Exhibition Part 2

    • You can see how much he loved films. What was interesting is that he preferred adapting the works of others as he loved getting the buzz of reacting to a great work and then putting that energy into a film. He was a perfectionist for sure.

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