Line(s) of the Day #TheSimpsons

Homer Simpson sweating

Actually Homer, that’s just one. See, each push-up includes both an up part and a down part.

Lenny (Harry Shearer) in the hugely influential and long-running cartoon The Simpsons (1989 – ). You can find more wit relating to the hilarious Homer, here, here and here.(Photo credit: The War of the Simpsons)

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Things to See: Ripley’s Believe It or Not

Ripley’s Believe It or Not! is an American franchise that deals in bizarre events and strange and unusual facts. It was founded by Robert Ripley in 1918 with a sports cartoon in the New York Globe. It soon sounded expanded to include items from other areas and then onto different formats like radio, television and books. Continuing that expansion have been the exhibitions first in the US, before countries like Mexico, Canada, India and Australia. And of course the UK. It was about time I saw the one in Piccadilly Circus, London.

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Line(s) of the Day #GroundhogDay

Groundhog Day

Well, what if there is no tomorrow? There wasn’t one today.

Phil Connors (Bill Murray) in the fantasy-comedy Groundhog Day (1993). Though coolly received by critics at the time, the story of a weatherman in a small town who keeps living the same day has gone on to be a much loved film. The term Groundhog Day has also become a common phrase, with the film itself entering the prestigious United States Film Registry in 2006.

Line(s) of the Day #FawltyTowers

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“So Harry says: “You don’t like me anymore.”
“Why not?”
And he says, “‘Cause you got so terribly pretentious.”
And Harry says, “Pretentious, moi?

As said by Mr Johnson (Nicky Henson) in the outrageously funny Torquay-set show Fawlty Towers  (1975 – 1979). Long considered one of the greatest British sitcoms ever, the main character of Basil Fawlty was based on a real-life rude hotel owner. Creator John Cleese had met him when he was still a Monty Python member.  You can find other examples of the show’s humour here.

Line(s) of the Day #ArrestedDevelopment

Arrested development a new start ed helms

Tobias Fünke: Listen, I’m an actor. You’re an agent. You do the math. I want you to represent me. In other words, you do the math. The money. The negotiating. 
James Carr: You know I’m not that kind of agent, right? I’m a real estate agent. I’m predator. I sell giant houses to very poor people who can’t afford them.
Tobias Fünke: You see that’s the money stuff I don’t understand. All you need to do is tell people what a terrific actor I am because I can’t do it believably. What do you say?
James Carr: Sounds like it shouldn’t be too much work.
Tobias Fünke: Huzzah!

David Cross and Ed Helms in the highly original and intricately plotted comedy Arrested Development (2003 – 2006 and 2013 -). Set mainly in California, the how tells the story of the wasteful Bluth family and their flawed attempts at recovering their financial status. You can find two more examples of the show’s humour here and here.

Line(s) of the Day #ItMustHaveBeenLove

It must have been love

It must have been love but it’s over now.
It must have been good but I lost it somehow.
It must have been love but it’s over now.
From the moment we touched ’til the time had run out.

Taken from the song It Must Have Been Love by Swedish band Roxette. Originally released in 1987, a slightly edited version appeared in 1990 as part of the Pretty Woman soundtrack and became their third US number one. The second of these was another classic, Listen to Your Heart.

Line(s) of the Day #ArtDonovan

Art Donovan food quote

I’m a light eater.  As soon as it’s light, I start to eat.

American football Hall of Famer and broadcaster Art Donovan (1924 – 2013). Nicknamed The Bulldog, the Donovan was a self-deprecating character and popular figure who titled his autobiography Fatso: Football When Men Were Really Men. 

Line(s) of the Day #WutheringHeights

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I have not broken your heart – you have broken it; and in breaking it, you have broken mine.

As said by the intensely tortured Heathcliff in Emily Bronte’s Gothic classic Wuthering Heights (1847). Famously set in the Moors of Yorkshire, the quote highlights the complex relationship between Heathcliff and Catherine Earnshaw, which drives the heart of the book. The gorgeous cover is entitled Figures in a Storm by one of my favourite artists. Percivus has nothing to do with the story but wanted to be included. It is a Penguin Classic after all.